SPOILERS: Dark Nights: Metal #1

I feel confident in saying this is the best thing DC has put out in years.

SPOILERS: Batman #29

All the villains had dinner, and no one died. Successes?

SPOILERS: Nightwing #27

Hey look, it's a Spyral reunion.

SPOILERS: Batwoman #6

Turns out Batwoman joining the Colony isn't exactly what you'd think.

SPOILERS: Detective Comics #962

Uh oh, Azrael has gone crazy again.

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

SPOILERS: Batman #24


So there's like one big thing that happens in this issue and I'm sure most everyone knows it already... I've known about it for while because... reasons, so that being said, I can't really offer up much about it, other than very general thoughts towards the action.

The Spoilers:

So, in a post-The Button world where Bruce's father told him to not be Batman, Bruce is having a conversation with Gotham Girl during the day. It's a lot of "where is your head at talk" with both of them talking about how they feel, what they should do, and what they want for each other. Short end of it is: Bruce isn't happy. He's scared. He's scared because if he wasn't, he'd be insane. 

Then later that night, with Bruce clearly being at a crossroads in his life, he proposes to Selina. 

The Opinion: 

So in general, this was a very Tom King written issue. It reminded me a lot of stuff like the Vision or Sheriff of Babylon, where it's just two characters talking and getting pretty deep with it. So, I enjoyed how this issue accomplished what it wanted to do.

So the proposal thing. I did a little tweeting about how I felt towards the idea of these two getting married, so if you care enough, look that up. Summary of it is: If we're doing this, then just fucking do it, make something of it, don't be typical comics and pull the rug out at the last moment. This is how I felt about the Nightwing potentially a father story, just fucking do it, grow some balls, take a big chance, make a mark on the character. Too many comics these days tease status quo changes, but nothing fucking happens, and it's annoying. Everyone is too afraid to do anything that won't leave the toys exactly where they were when they're done and corporate comics suffer from this, because it makes everything too easy to sweep away if need be.

So again, for lack of a better term, commit. If we're doing this, then fucking do it, and don't pull the "It was better with masks and a chase" card between these two again, because we've all seen that before. 

8 comments :

  1. That is honestly how I feel. Just do it since far too often in comics, something gets introduced and then the status quo doesn't get changed anyways. Actually having the characters marry would be a cool and new thing. Stop teasing it and just do it.

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    1. Agreed. If Superman can have a kid for once, why can't Batman (who has a kid and other adopted ones) marry his love? I get it's weird a bit, but it's new and I want change. King seems like the kind of guy to accomplish that.

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    2. I just have the feeling that it either won't happen or it won't work out because you know, comics. With Tom King as the writer and since he is gutsy with his work, I feel like there's a chance that he will follow through on it. I will not be happy honestly if he doesn't since it will feel like a cop out.

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    3. There's a few things that just makes me assume this is a situation where they won't commit. First is their editorial history, which is pretty clear when it comes to things like this. And second is the fact that Snyder is still heavily involved with Batman, and he's always viewed Bruce as an aromantic character whose only "partner" is Gotham. I know King is the main series writer now, but I have a feeling Snyder still "outranks" him in these discussions.

      Anyway, I wish they'd commit, but I don't see it happening.

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    4. I don't see it happening either and one big reason is that then everyone would have to mention it across all of the Batman comics. I don't see that happening in Detective Comics and definitely not All Star with Snyder as the writer doing whatever he wants to do. With both DC's and Marvel's editorial history, that's also a big red flag that they aren't going to commit to this either. I'd love to be wrong like a lot of people, but it's going to end up as a cop out. The only way it wouldn't become one with them following through is because of Tom King and if his clout was large enough at this point, but I very much doubt he could pull something like that right now.

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  2. And of course we won't find out her answer until after The War of Jokes and Riddles, which is a flashback arc.

    "It's not a big enough diamond now," should be her answer.

    I would pay good money to see Damian have to put up with Catwoman as his stepmother. Ooooh, and Talia's reaction. Imagine dinners at the Kents, Bruce and Clark, Damian and Jon, Selina and Lois.

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  3. Not sure where this is going but I really don't think it ends with cute family dinners or any sort of domestic bliss. Neither Batman nor Catwoman works as a traditional married character. Even if one can squint and picture Bruce Wayne settling down, having Catwoman reform and become Selina Wayne, Society Wife neuters that character in a way that renders her unrecognizable.

    That's not to say King won't have them get married - certainly I do not know. But if he does, it's not going to be a happily ever after scenario. The through-line of this whole run has been that King's Batman is probably the most profoundly broken iteration of the character to date. Selina may be slightly less broken but not by much. What "marriage" looks like for two people who are that screwed up might be interesting to explore, but it's a fairly safe bet it's not beach weekends and family dinners.

    King knows what he's doing, I trust. He wrote "Rooftops" after all which IMO is the best Batman/ Catwoman story ever. I suspect he's more than smart enough to realize that a Superman or Spider-Man-style happy ending marriage would just become a narrative problem that would have to be undone within five years, and that the proposal is in service of a story he is telling and intends to see to a conclusion.

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